Birdwatching in Andalucía: The top 60 bird species

This is our personal selection of the top 60 bird species that you can observe during a birdwatching tour in Andalucía, with information about the status, the phelonogy and a recommendation of the best day trips to observe them. You can see here the criteria we have followed to select them.

Marbled Duck

Marmaronetta angustirostris

Phenology in Andalucía

Status in Andalusia: At the end of the 19th century it was the most abundant duck in the Doñana marshes. However, it is now on the edge of extinction, with only around 30 pairs breeding in Doñana each year. After breeding, it disperses and may appear in other Andalusian wetlands. There is also an interchange of individuals with the North African population. There are many reasons for this drastic decline, but it is mainly due to habitat loss and degradation, together with illegal hunting and poisoning by lead pellets.

Our best day trips to observe it:

Northern Doñana          Southern Doñana          Brazo del Este          Birding Big Day

Marbled Duck

Ferruginous Duck

Aythya nyroca

Phenology in Andalucía

Status in Andalusia: It is critically endangered, although it was once much more abundant. The main cause of its decline is that it does not tolerate saline or eutrophicated waters. It currently nests sporadically in Andalusia, mainly in Doñana. It is slightly more abundant and more widespread during the winter, when some birds may arrive from other European countries.

Our best day trips to observe it:

Northern Doñana          Brazo del Este          Birding Big Day

Ferruginous Duck

White-headed Duck

Oxyura leucocephala

Phenology in Andalucía

Status in Andalusia: It was very close to extinction, reaching a minimum of only 22 birds in 1977 at Zóñar Lagoon (Córdoba). It was never a very abundant bird in Andalusia. Its main threats are hunting (especially in the past), the degradation of water quality and the disappearance of underwater vegetation due to the introduction of allochthonous fish. The population is increasing, although it is still localised as a nesting bird, with 15-30 pairs in Doñana and a few more in other Andalusian wetlands. Outside the breeding season, higher concentrations can be observed and it is more distributed.

Our best day trips to observe it:

White-headed Duck

Balearic Shearwater

Puffinus mauretanicus

Phenology in Andalucía

Status in Andalusia: It nests in the Balearic Islands, but it can be observed from the Andalusian coast throughout the year, more likely during their migrations between the Mediterranean Sea and the Atlantic Ocean.

Our best day trips to observe it:

Balearic Shearwater

Greater Flamingo

Phoenicopterus roseus

Phenology in Andalucía

Status in Andalusia: Andalusia holds two important colonies, Fuente de Piedra (Málaga) and Marismas del Odiel (Huelva), with fluctuating numbers but gathering and important part of the European population. Sporadically they nest also in Doñana, where it is present all year round.

Our best day trips to observe it:

Northern Doñana          Southern Doñana          Western Doñana          Birding Big Day

Greater Flamingo

Northern Bald Ibis

Geronticus eremita

Phenology in Andalucía

Status in Andalusia: Due to a reintroduction program, now Andalusia has a population of around 100 wild birds (25 nesting pairs) of one of the most endangered bird species all over the world. Historically it was present in the Iberian Peninsula, probably until the 16th century.

Our best day trips to observe it:

Northern Bald Ibis

Great Bittern

Botaurus stellaris

Phenology in Andalucía

Status in Andalusia: Very scarce as nesting bird in Doñana, the only Andalucian location where it breeds. During the winter it is more widespread and slightly more common. In the past it was much more widespread, but during the 20th century there was a dramatic decline that almost led to its extinction, mainly due to the transformation and degradation of wetlands and hunting.

Our best day trips to observe it:

Great Bittern

Black-winged Kite

Elanus caeruleus

Phenology in Andalucía

Status in Andalusia: The first nest in Spain of this African colonizer was found as recently as 1973, although it had been observed many times before. It is now quite widespread in western Andalusia.

Our best day trips to observe it:

black-shouldered kite

Egyptian Vulture

Neophron percnopterus

Phenology in Andalucía

Status in Andalusia: It is catalogued as in danger of extinction in Andalucía, with only 25 nesting pairs in 2019 (Junta de Andalucía), distributed in the Sierra Morena and the Baetic Ranges, with Cadiz as its main stronghold. It has a negative trend (81 pairs in 1987) with a stabilization in recent years. Its main threats are the use of poison and wind farms. About 2500 cross the Strait of Gibraltar during their migration (Fundación Migres).

Our best day trips to observe it:

Egyptian Vulture

Lammergeier

Gypaetus barbatus

Phenology in Andalucía

Status in Andalusia: Formerly, it was a common bird in Andalusia, but due the action of the man (poisoning, shooting…) it experienced a fast decline, disappearing as a nesting bird in 1983. Thanks to a reintroduction program, with the first releases in 2006, now they are nesting again in Cazorla, Segura y las Villas Natural Park. At present (2020) there are 5 territorial units and it is probable an increase of nesting pairs in the future.

Our best day trips to observe it:

It is not possible to observe it during our day trips in Western Andalusia but it is one of the highlights of our trip Andalucía Birding Tour: along the Guadalquivir River

Lammergeier

Eurasian Griffon Vulture

Gyps fulvus

Phenology in Andalucía

Status in Andalusia: Andalusia is one of its Spanish strongholds, with around 4,000 nesting pairs. They are joined by a large contingent of non-breeding birds. In addition, many juveniles from all over the Iberian Peninsula cross Andalusia on their migration to and from Africa. It has experienced a large population increase in recent decades.

Our best day trips to observe it:

Eurasian Griffon Vulture

Rüppell’s Griffon Vulture

Gyps rueppellii

Phenology in Andalucía

Status in Andalusia: It is a species native to sub-Saharan Africa, where it is highly endangered. During the last three decades the number of observations in Andalusia has been increasing, especially of young birds. These come to Spain following the migratory flocks of Eurasian Griffon Vulture. Sometimes they return to Africa, but may remain in Andalusia, where even recently signs of hybridisation with Eurasian Griffon Vulture have been detected.

Our best day trips to observe it:

Ruppell's Griffon Vulture // Buitre moteado

Eurasian Black Vulture

Aegypius monachus

Phenology in Andalucía

Status in Andalusia: The Andalusian nesting colonies are restricted to Sierra Morena, but sometimes non nesting birds, or birds during their movements searching food, can be seen almost everywhere in Andalucía. 429 nesting pairs were censed in 2019 in Andalucía (Junta de Andalucía). The main nesting colonies are Sierra Pelada in Huelva and Sierra Norte in Seville. Although it’s still in danger (cataloged as Vulnerable), the population is increasing year after year (in the 70s the number of nesting pairs was less than 100).

Our best day trips to observe it:

Eurasian Black Vulture

Bonelli’s Eagle

Aquila fasciata

Phenology in Andalucía

Status in Andalusia: There are two different reproductive cores in Andalucía, Sierra Morena and the Baetic Ranges (the latter host the most of the population, favored by a more rocky terrain and less competition with other raptors). In 2018, 337 pairs were registered (Junta de Andalucía), which is about 45% of the Spanish population. It is cataloged as Vulnerable in Andalusia, and although it was increasing its population, this trend seems to have been reversed in recent years.

Our best day trips to observe it:

Bonelli's Eagle

Spanish Imperial Eagle

Aquila adalberti

Phenology in Andalucía

Status in Andalusia: It is catalogued as in danger of extinction (EN). In the 90s the census was less than 30 pairs, but it shows a positive trend, with 116 pairs in 2019 (Junta de Andalucía). The main reproductive cores are Sierra Morena, Doñana National Park and Cádiz and it has numerous areas of dispersion in areas with abundant trophic resources. Their main threats are electrocution and poaching.

Our best day trips to observe it:

Sierra Norte of Seville          Northern Doñana          Strait of Gibraltar          Birding Big Day

Spanish Imperial Eagle

Golden Eagle

Aquila chrysaetos

Phenology in Andalucía

Status in Andalusia: It is the most abundant of the big Andalusian eagles, distributed through most of the Andalusian mountainous areas. In 2018, 363 pairs were counted (Junta de Andalucía). The main threat at the moment is electrocution and direct persecution, but its trend is positive.

Our best day trips to observe it:

Golden Eagle

Pallid Harrier

Circus macrourus

Phenology in Andalucía

Status in Andalusia: It is very rare but now regular migrant and winter bird in Andalucía. In recent years we are seeing a large increase in the number of observations, probably due the establishment of a new breeding population in northern Europe. The main nesting range of the Pallid Harrier is eastern Europe and Asia, and the main winter quarters are located across the Sahel, eastern and southern Africa and India.

Our best day trips to observe it:

Pallid Harrier

Great Bustard

Otis tarda

Phenology in Andalucía

Status in Andalusia: This bustard is threatened in Andalucía (category EN) but with a positive trend in recent years. It presents two different subpopulations, the Guadalquivir valley and the NO of Cordoba, separated by Sierra Morena. In 2019 the population was 420 adults (Junta de Andalucía). The main Andalusian population is located in Seville countryside. Its main threats are the agricultural intensification and changes in land use, especially the expansion of olive trees and solar farms.

Our best day trips to observe it:

Great Bustard

Little Bustard

Tetrax tetrax

Phenology in Andalucía

Status in Andalusia: It is catalogued as Vulnerable in Andalucía. Although it is present in all the provinces, it is absent in so many steppary areas. The last census was carried out in 2016, with an estimation of 5.800 individuals (Junta de Andalucía). That represents a worrying 43% descent respect the previous census (2010). One of the main threats are the transformation and intensification of the farming areas. During the winter it appears in some areas where it is absent during the nesting season.

Our best day trips to observe it:

Little Bustard

Purple Swamphen

Porphyrio porphyrio

Phenology in Andalucía

Status in Andalusia: It is distributed through the main Andalusian wetlands, with Doñana and its surroundings as stronghold. Although it was very close to the extinction in the 20th century, it popped out and incredible recuperation in the 80s. However, it suffers strong oscillations due to droughts and it is impacted by illegal human persecution in some areas (paddy fields).

Our best day trips to observe it:

Purple Swamphen

Red-knobbed Coot

Fulica cristata

Phenology in Andalucía

Status in Andalusia:The Red-knobbed Coot is an African species that in the 19th century was well spread throughout the Iberian Peninsula.During the 20th century it suffered a serious decline, mainly due to the loss of habitats and hunting, and was therefore relegated to Doñana and its surroundings. Reintroduction programmes are reinforcing the Doñana population and recovering populations from other regions. Even so, the number of pairs in Doñana is very low and fluctuates, varying from practically none to a few dozen, depending mainly on the level of flooding. Besides Doñana, it is also present in a few Andalusian wetlands in very low numbers. It is classified as in danger of extinction.

Our best day trips to observe it:

Northern Doñana          Southern Doñana          Brazo del Este

Red-Knobbed Coot

Collared Pratincole

Glareola pratincola

Phenology

Status in Andalusia: Classified as endangered (EN) in Andalusia. It is a summer species that nest both, in wetlands and in agricultural areas near masses of water. The last regional census of 2010 counted 4331 pairs (Junta de Andalucía), being its main strongholds Doñana and its surroundings, the Bay of Cadiz and the Seville countryside. Its current evolution is unknown due to the lack of regional census, but in Doñana it has decreased compared to previous estimates.

Our best day trips to observe it:

Northern Doñana          Southern Doñana          Brazo del Este

Collared Pratincole

Audouin’s Gull

Ichthyaetus audouinii

Phenology in Andalucía

Status in Andalusia: The Audouin’s Gull has experienced a remarkable increase in the number of individuals and breeding locations in Spain in the last decades, but it is still classified as Vulnerable in Andalusia. In Andalusia the only breeding location is the Alboran Island with about 800 pairs in 2018 (Junta de Andalucia) but subject to fluctuations (no breeding in 2020). It can be seen on the Andalusian coast throughout the year, being more abundant during migrations. During the winter it is more common on the Atlantic coast, although the bulk of the population winters in Africa.

Our best day trips to observe it:

Audouin's Gull

Gull-billed Tern

Gelochelidon nilotica

Phenology

Status in Andalusia: A summer bird that breeds in wetlands and reservoirs. Its main breeding grounds in Andalucía are Doñana and Laguna de Fuente de Piedra. In the 2007 national census the Andalusian population was estimated at 2500 pairs, which is 42% of the Spanish population, the main one at European level. In the regional census of 2014 only 973 couples were detected in Andalusia (Junta de Andalucia), so it seems to be suffering a strong decline.

Our best day trips to observe it:

Northern Doñana          Southern Doñana          Western Doñana          Brazo del Este          Seville countryside

Gull-billed Tern

Black-bellied Sandgrouse

Pterocles orientalis

Phenology in Andalucía

Status in Andalusia: Steppeland bird catalogued as vulnerable. In Andalusia, at least 615 individuals were detected in 2019 (Junta de Andalucía). It is present in all Andalusian provinces except Cádiz, although very dispersed and localized. A decline of 19% has been detected with respect to the previous census in 2017. It is very threatened, as are the other steppeland birds, due to the change from herbaceous crops to olive groves, the installation of photovoltaic plants, the disappearance of fallow land and the excessive use of phytosanitary products.

Our best day trips to observe it:

Black-bellied Sandgrouse

Pin-tailed Sandgrouse

Pterocles alchata

Phenology in Andalucía

Status in Andalusia: Very localised in Andalusia, where its distribution is practically restricted to the Doñana Marshes and the region of Los Pedroches (Córdoba). More occasionally observed in the countryside of the southern part of the province of Seville and the northern part of Cadiz. In the 2019 census, 1304  specimens were estimated (Junta de Andalucía). Classified as Vulnerable and with an unknown population trend.

Our best day trips to observe it:

Pin-tailed Sandgrouse

Great Spotted Cuckoo

Clamator glandarius

Status in Andalusia: Very dispersed range during the breeding season, absent from most of the Guadalquivir Valley. More frequent in eastern Andalusia. Locally common and very associated with the presence of its main host, the Common Magpie. Widespread presence throughout the year but with maximum abundance between February and July.

Our best day trips to observe it:

Great Spotted Cuckoo

European Scops Owl

Otus scops

Phenology in Andalucía

Status in Andalusia: Migrant bird mainly present from March to October. Some remain through the winter but are very inconspicuous at that time. Common and widespread, associated with open woodland, riverside woodland and even city parks and gardens.

Our best day trips to observe it:

European Scops Owl

Eurasian Eagle Owl

Bubo bubo

Phenology in Andalucía

Status in Andalusia: Fairly widespread and locally common, especially in some parts of Sierra Morena where rabbits are abundant. Also present in Doñana and its surroundings. It can occupy very diverse habitats, not exclusively rocky areas, as long as there are enough preys, but it avoids dense forests.

Our best day trips to observe it:

Eurasian Eagle Owl

Red-necked Nightjar

Caprimulgus ruficollis

Phenology

Status in Andalusia: Summer bird mainly present from April to October, with scarce sightings at other times and very exceptional sightings during the winter. Widely distributed but with very variable densities. It prefers low and thermal areas, with open areas next to scrubland or woodland, crops, pastures… Very abundant in some sections of Doñana.

Our best day trips to observe it:

Northern Doñana          Strait of Gibraltar          Western Doñana          Birding Big Day

Red-necked Nightjar

Pallid Swift

Apus pallidus

Phenology

Status in Andalusia: It is one of the most common swifts in Andalusia and can be seen flying over any habitat. It is present throughout most of the year and has also been observed wintering in the city of Seville.

Our best day trips to observe it:

It can be observed during any of them.

Pallid Swift

White-rumped Swift

Apus caffer

Phenology

Status in Andalusia: Bird of African origin, first recorded in Spain in 1964. It is still rare and localised in Andalusia, associated with Red-rumped Swallows, as it uses their nests for breeding. Known pairs are mainly located in the western Sierra Morena and in the area around the Strait of Gibraltar.

Our best day trips to observe it:

White-rumped Swift

Little Swift

Apus affinis

Phenology in Andalucía

Status in Andalusia: It is distributed throughout Africa and Asia, and was first recorded in Andalusia in 1981. There are currently a few colonies on the coast of Cadiz and it is also present in much smaller numbers in the Sierra Norte de Sevilla. During the winter it can be observed in Southern Doñana.

Our best day trips to observe it:

Little Swift

European Roller

Coracias garrulus

Phenology

Status in Andalusia: Bird associated with steppe areas in Andalusia. Population size unknown but in significant decline. Highly threatened by agricultural intensification and the increase in woody crops, the proliferation of photovoltaic plants in its territories and the loss of nesting sites (mainly due to the deterioration of the farms where it breeds). Absent or very scarce as a nesting bird in the provinces of Cádiz, Huelva and Málaga, where it can be observed during migration.

Our best day trips to observe it:

European Roller

European Bee-eater

Merops apiaster

Phenology

Status in Andalusia: Very common and distributed throughout Andalusia, although it avoids the highest areas. It occupies all types of environments as long as there are open areas in which to hunt and a suitable substrate in which to dig its nest. It can be seen virtually anywhere during its migrations.

Our best day trips to observe it:

There are good observation possibilities on all our day trips.

European Bee-eater

Iberian Green Woodpecker

Picus sharpei

Phenology in Andalucía

Status in Andalusia: It has been split from the European Green Woodpecker for some years, making it an Iberian endemism, penetrating a little into southern France. Locally common, but usually elusive. It is distributed throughout Andalusia but is absent from most of the Guadalquivir depression. Not as closely dependent on woodland as other woodpeckers, it can occupy treeless areas.

Our best day trips to observe it:

Iberian Green Woodpecker

Lesser Kestrel

Falco naumanni

Phenology in Andalucía

Status in Andalusia: An essentially summer species, with the first birds arriving in February. However, a small part of the population overwinters in Andalusia, which means that in certain places it can be seen throughout the year. It is distributed across all the Andalusian provinces, although most of the population is located in the Guadalquivir Valley. It nests mainly in buildings, both in towns and in isolated farms in the countryside, but it needs open areas for hunting. Since population estimates were carried out (1986) it showed a positive trend until 2012, when it reached a maximum of just over 5000 pairs. At that time a marked decline of up to 50% began, with a minimum of 2457 pairs estimated in Andalusia in 2016 (Junta de Andalucía). Since then, a stabilisation process seems to have begun, with 2650 pairs estimated in 2019 (Junta de Andalucía). Its main threats are the decrease in insect prey due to agricultural intensification and the loss of nesting sites.

Our best day trips to observe it:

Northern Doñana          Strait of Gibraltar          Seville countryside          Birding Big Day

Lesser Kestrel

Southern Grey Shrike

Lanius meridionalis

Phenology in Andalucía

Status in Andalusia: Nearly endemic to the Iberian Peninsula, also present in the south of France. Distributed throughout Andalusia but avoids the higher areas and some sectors of the Guadalquivir Valley. Locally common. It shows a predilection for open woodland and scattered scrubland, and also tree crops as long as there are edges or patches of natural vegetation. Although it is mainly resident, in winter it appears in some areas where it is absent as a breeding bird. In marked decline, its main threats are agricultural intensification and the reduction in insect prey populations.

Our best day trips to observe it:

Southern Grey Shrike

Woodchat Shrike

Lanius senator

Phenology

Status in Andalusia: Widespread in Andalusia, locally common.  Scarcer in the Guadalquivir Valley and Sierra Nevada.  Inhabits open areas with scattered trees or bushes, dehesas and unirrigated tree crops. In decline due to loss of habitat and reduction of the insects on which it feeds due to agricultural intensification.

Our best day trips to observe it:

Woodchat Shrike

Iberian Magpie

Cyanopica cooki

Phenology in Andalucía

Status in Andalusia: Recently split from the Azure-winged Magpie, so it is an endemic species of the Iberian Peninsula. Common and widespread on the right bank of the Guadalquivir River, especially abundant in the forests of Doñana and Sierra Morena. Much more localised on the other bank, with a single outstanding core on the border between the provinces of Malaga and Granada. Very gregarious throughout the year, especially in winter flocks of more than 100 individuals can be observed.

Our best day trips to observe it:

Northern Doñana          Sierra Norte of Seville          Birding Big Day          Western Doñana

Iberian Magpie

Lesser Short-toed Lark

Alaudula rufescens

Phenology in Andalucía

Status in Andalusia: It occupies sparse shrubby vegetation in marshy areas, often saline, and also similar vegetation in steppe areas, but avoids crops. In Andalusia it is concentrated in the marshes of Doñana, the Cádiz Bay and other points of the coast of Cádiz, Cabo de Gata (Almería) and some inland localities in Granada. Threatened by habitat loss but locally common.

Our best day trips to observe it:

Lesser Short-toed Lark

Thekla Lark

Galerida theklae

Phenology in Andalucía

Status in Andalusia: It prefers less flat and more rugged terrain than the Crested Lark, which is why it tends to replace the latter in the mountains. It can also be found near the coast in areas of dunes or open scrubland. Locally common in the mountain areas, but rare in the Guadalquivir Valley.

Our best day trips to observe it:

Thekla Lark

Calandra Lark

Melanocorypha calandra

Phenology in Andalucía

Status in Andalusia: In Andalusia it mainly inhabits the Guadalquivir Valley, the coasts of Huelva, Cadiz and Almeria and the inland steppes of Granada. Locally common. It inhabits cereal crops with fallow land and grassland, avoiding tree crops and irrigated land. After the breeding season it gathers in flocks. Threatened by agricultural intensification.

Our best day trips to observe it:

Northern Doñana          Southern Doñana          Birding Big Day          Seville Countryside

Calandra Lark

Dupont’s Lark

Chersophilus duponti

Phenology in Andalucía

Status in Andalusia: It is in a critical situation in Andalusia (although it is still only catalogued as Vulnerable). It occupies steppes with slight inclination and a large proportion of bare ground. In recent decades there has been a progressive loss of occupied areas and number of individuals. In 2019 only 10 males were detected (Junta de Andalucía),  compared to 85 in the 1990s. It is currently present in 1 locality in Granada (Lomas de Padul) and 2 in Almería (Cabo de Gata-Níjar and Tabernas-Sorbas).

Our best day trips to observe it:

Absent in Western Andalusia.

Dupont's Lark

Red-rumped Swallow

Cecropis daurica

Phenology in Andalucía

Status in Andalusia: It is a recent coloniser from Africa. Its breeding was not confirmed in Spain until the 1920s. It is currently a common and widespread bird in Andalusia, although it avoids the higher areas. It nests in caves, bridges, tunnels… Although it is a summer bird (February-October), a few may remain in Andalusia during the winter.

Our best day trips to observe it:

It can be seen in any of our day trips.

Red-rumped Swallow

Iberian Chiffchaff

Phylloscopus ibericus

Phenology in Andalucía

Status in Andalusia: A summer species nearly endemic to the Iberian Peninsula, also present in SW France and North Africa. In Andalusia it occupies humid and riverside forests, mainly in the provinces of Cádiz and Huelva. Scarce in the Sierra Norte de Sevilla and even rarer and more localised the more towards the E. More widespread during its migrations.

Our best day trips to observe it:

Iberian Chiffchaff

Bonelli’s Warbler

Phylloscopus bonelli

Phenology

Status in Andalusia: A summer species that inhabits forests of all kinds, normally avoiding the lower, warmer areas. It is common as a breeding bird in the Sierras of Cádiz, but it is absent in Seville and Huelva. It is more widespread in eastern Andalusia, mainly in the Betic Range. During its migrations it can be seen anywhere.

Our best day trips to observe it:

Bonelli's Warbler

Western Olivaceous Warbler

Iduna opaca

Phenology

Status in Andalusia: A very thermophile bird of low-lying areas, associated with riparian vegetation (mainly Tamarix) of watercourses and the banks of lakes and reservoirs. It can be found in the Guadalquivir Valley, the Almeria ramblas and various rivers in Malaga. Absent in large areas such as most of Huelva and Granada.

Our best day trips to observe it:

Northern Doñana          Southern Doñana          Brazo del Este

Western Olivaceous Warbler

Spectacled Warbler

Curruca conspicillata

Phenology

Status in Andalusia: It occupies shrubby environments of various types, both salt marshes and open scrubland in arid and mountainous areas, although it avoids the highest altitudes. Very discontinuous distribution in Andalusia, its main strongholds being Doñana and Almeria. Exceptionally wintering in our territory, but regularly in neighbouring areas.

Our best day trips to observe it:

Spectacled Warbler

Western Subalpine Warbler

Curruca iberiae

Phenology in Andalucía

Status in Andalusia: Recently separated from the Eastern Subalpine Warbler (Curruca cantillans) and the Moltoni’s Warbler (Curruca subalpina) from the central and eastern Mediterranean. Formerly all three taxa were considered monospecific. It is therefore distributed in north-west Africa, the Iberian Peninsula, southern France and north-west Italy. It occupies various types of well-developed scrubland with woodland. Absent from the valleys, it occurs mainly in the Sierra Morena (scarce in the west, more abundant towards the east) and the Baetic mountains.

Our best day trips to observe it:

Subalpine Warbler

Western Orphean Warbler

Sylvia hortensis

Phenology

Status in Andalusia: Warbler typical of dehesas and areas of open woodland, both with and without shrub cover. It prefers thermal areas. Absent from a large part of the Guadalquivir Valley and the higher altitudes.

Our best day trips to observe it:

Western Orphean Warbler

Spotless Starling

Sturnus unicolor

Phenology in Andalucía

Status in Andalusia: A very common bird in towns, cities, crops and fields throughout Andalusia. The bulk of the world’s population is found on the Iberian Peninsula, where it experienced a great expansion during the last century.

Our best day trips to observe it:

It can be seen in any of our day trips.

Spotless Starling

Rufous-tailed Scrub-Robin

Cercotrichas galactotes

Phenology

Status in Andalusia: Local in Andalusia. Currently, its main areas of presence are vineyards around Doñana (provinces of Huelva, Seville and Cádiz), olive groves in Córdoba and Jaén and semi-arid areas in Almería. Over the last few decades, there has been both a contraction in the areas occupied and a decrease in its density. Highly threatened by the excessive use of phytosanitary products that kill its prey (insects) and agricultural intensification that reduces the distance between trees and eliminates boundaries and patches of natural vegetation between fields. Classified as in danger of extinction in Andalusia.

Our best day trips to observe it:

Western Doñana          Southern Doñana          Brazo del Este

Rufous-tailed Scrub Robin

Blue Rock-Thrush

Monticola solitarius

Phenology in Andalucía

Status in Andalusia: Bird typical of rocky terrain, which can also occupy castles, ruins and human buildings. Absent from most of the Guadalquivir Valley due to lack of suitable habitat. The highest densities are found in the Baetic mountains, where it is locally common. Scarcer in Sierra Morena due to fewer rocky outcrops. Although it is mainly resident, in winter it appears in some areas where it does not nest.

Our best day trips to observe it:

Blue Rock-Thrush

Black-eared Wheatear

Oenanthe hispanica

Phenology

Status in Andalusia: Widespread bird in Andalusia, associated with open, dry scrubland at low altitudes, it can also occupy tree crops such as vineyards and olive groves. Scarce in the Guadalquivir Valley and Sierra Morena and more frequent in the Baetic mountains. In decline, probably due to agricultural intensification and excessive proliferation of scrub due to the abandonment of grazing.

Our best day trips to observe it:

Black-eared Wheatear

Black Wheatear

Oenanthe leucura

Phenology in Andalucía

Status in Andalusia: Bird of rocky or arid areas with a high proportion of bare ground.It can also occupy human constructions. It is common in some sectors of the Baetic Range and arid areas of Almeria and Granada. Much scarcer and localised in Sierra Morena due to lack of suitable habitat. In considerable decline in recent decades, probably due to the proliferation of areas covered by scrub and woodland in the absence of grazing.

Our best day trips to observe it:

Black Wheatear

Spanish Sparrow

Passer hispanolensis

Phenology in Andalucía

Status in Andalusia: Very common and widespread in the western half of Andalusia, much scarcer and more localised in the eastern half. Usually associated with crops of all kinds. Large concentrations can be observed throughout the year, both in breeding colonies (located in trees) and in roosts and when there are large concentrations of food. Mainly sedentary, but some cross the Strait of Gibraltar. It is expanding its range.

Our best day trips to observe it:

Northern Doñana          Seville Countryside          Brazo del Este

Spanish Sparrow

Rock Sparrow

Petronia petronia

Phenology in Andalucía

Status in Andalusia: Absent from the Guadalquivir Valley and the lowest altitudes. It mainly occupies rocky areas in the Baetic range and dehesas in the Sierra Morena. Sedentary, but may appear during the winter in some agricultural areas where it does not nest.

Our best day trips to observe it:

Rock Sparrow

Trumpeter Finch

Bucanetes githagineus

Phenology in Andalucía

Status in Andalusia: Very localised in Andalusia. It inhabits arid areas with rugged terrain. Present only in a number of enclaves in the province of Almería and also in the Hoyas de Guadix and Baza in Granada, from sea level to approximately 1000 m above sea level. Very rarely seen outside these areas. In winter it disappears from some areas and becomes more abundant on the coast. Population size and evolution unknown.

Our best day trips to observe it:

Absent from Western Andalusia.

Trumpeter Finch

Rock Bunting

Emberiza cia

Phenology in Andalucía

Status in Andalusia: A common bird, widely distributed throughout the mountainous areas of Andalusia. Absent in the Guadalquivir valley. Prefers rocky terrain, with variable shrub and tree cover, but needs patches of bare ground. Sedentary with altitudinal movements in winter.

Our best day trips to observe it:

Rock Bunting
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